Tag Archives: Michelle Williams

Certain Women, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * *

Cast: Laura Dern, Michelle Williams, Kristin Stewart, Lily Gladstone, James Le Gros, Jared Harris, Rene Auberjonis, Ashlie Atkinson, Guy Boyd, Edelen McWilliams, John Getz, James Jordan, Matt McTighe, Joshua T. Fonkalafi, Sara Rodier, Stephanie Campbell, Kilty Reidy, Marceline Hugot, Zena Dell Lowe, Kory Gunderson.

There is always a high expectation when it comes to some films, the anticipation in which well documented narrative might offer a new direction of thought in appreciation in how others live, how to see the world through the eyes of another might produce some much needed empathy in a world dominated by the fast, the furious and the often extraordinary; it is always a hope, one sometimes fulfilled, yet sadly, not many revelations are to gleaned in Certain Women.

Manchester By The Sea, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Cast: Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams, Lucas Hedges, Kyle Chandler, Gretchen Mol, Kara Hayward, Heather Burns, Anna Katerina Baryschnikov, Tate Donovan, Matthew Broderick, C.J. Wilson, Heather Burns, Erica McDermott.

People, like places, can hold their secrets for as long as possible, the strange ways in which a village ticks can also manifest itself in the way that a person’s mind can become; closed off, unable to deal with a certain moment in the past to the point where it just no longer acknowledges the Time ever existed, till it becomes hearsay, rumour, dismissed gossip in the next generation coming through.

Suite Française, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

Cast: Michelle Williams, Kristin Scott Thomas, Matthais Schoenaerts, Sam Riley, Ruth Wilson, Margot Robbie, Harriet Walter, Eileen Atkins, Lambert Wilson, Tom Schilling, Clare Holman, Deborah Findlay, Eric Godon, Simon Dutton, Diana Kent, Juliet Howland, Nicholas Chagrin.

 

As the 21st Century grumbles on and the further we move away from the period of time in which our grandparents gave up on almost everything except hope, the more the apathy to maintaining the struggle against oppression grows more weary. In some cases it is possible to hear some people state out loud, “Shouldn’t we forget all this now?” Yet stories from the Second World War continue to surface and perhaps none more startling in recent years than that of Irène Némirovsky and her posthumously published unfinished novel Suite Française.

Take This Waltz, Film Review. (F.A.C.T. Cinema Screenings)

Originally published by L.S. Media. August 14th 2012.

L.S. Media Rating ****

Cast: Michelle Williams, Seth Rogan, Sarah Silverman, Luke Kirby, Aaron Abrahams, Raoul Bhaneja, Albert Howell, Dianne Flacks, Diane D’Aquila, Danielle Miller.

The leafy streets of Toronto don’t have that many films attached to it to make it a serious rival to New York in which to shoot feature films, the sense of history is not quite there. Instead of the usual camera shots of well-worn cliché ridden snippets of Central Park, coffee houses and exclusive apartments, Take This Waltz relied on the majesty of the Toronto skyline and the idyllic settings of Little Portugal and Lake Ontario. For that alone gives the film credibility as it strays away from the well beaten production North American film path.