Tag Archives: Harry Lloyd

Anthropoid, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Cast: Jamie Dornan, Cillian Murphy, Toby Jones, Brian Caspe, Karel Hermánek Jr., Sara Arsteinova, Sean Mahon, Jan Hájek, Marcin Dorocinski, Alena Mihulová, Bill Milner, Charlotte Le Bon, Pavel Reznícek, Anna Geislerová, Justin Svoboda, Harry Lloyd, Václav Neuzil, Jiri Simek, Detlof Bothe, Jan Budar, Mish Boyko, David Bredin, Roman Zach, Sam Keeley, Alexander van der Groeben, Andrej Polak.

Marcella, Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

Cast: Anna Friel, Ray Panthaki, Nina Sosanya, Nicholas Pinnock, Charlie Covell, Sinéad Cusack, Jack Doolan, Harry Lloyd, Tobias Santelmann, Jamie Bamber, Patrick Baladi, Ben Cura, Ian Puleston-Davies, Emil Hostina, Susannah Wise, Imogen Fairies, Laura Carmichael, Stephen Lord, Yasen Atour, Jasmine Breinburg, Florence Pugh, Nick Hendrix, George Barnes, Andrew Lancel, Maeve Dermody.

The art of the Noir is to keep the viewer or reader guessing long enough that they doubt their own verdict, their own deductive reasoning and to question further their own possible prejudices of one suspect or another. It is an art fully utilised by the writers of the series Marcella and one that really got under the skin as each episode progressed.

The Theory of Everything, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast:  Eddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones, Harry Lloyd, David Thewlis, Maxine Peake, Simon McBurney, Emily Watson, Guy Oliver-Watts, Lucy Chappell, Charlotte Hope, Abigail Cruttenden, Christian McKay, Adam Godley, Alice Orr-Ewing, Thomas Morrison, Michael Marcus, Nicola Sloane, Nicholas Gerard-Martin, Brett Brown, Anthony Skimshire, Eileen Davies, Simon Chandler, Georg Nikoloff, Tom Prior, Sophie Perry, Finlay Wright-Stephens, Gruffudd Glyn, Paul Longley, Enzo Cilenti.

The Fear (Episode Four), Channel Four. Television Review.

Picture from Channel 4.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Peter Mullan, Anastasia Hille, Harry Lloyd, Paul Nicholls, Richard E. Grant, Demosthenes Chrysan, Dragos Bucar, Shaban Arifi, Julia Ragnarsson, Danny Sapani, Nigel Lindsay, Osy Ikhile, Sidney Kean, Lisa McAllister, Catherine Winter, Amarildo Kola.

Richard Cotton’s acclaimed television drama, The Fear, reached its final destructive conclusion whilst retaining the excellent writing from beginning to end and not entertaining the idea of slipping into the realms of outlandish fantasy. It is for this that the writer and cast must be applauded fully for giving a distinctive and sensitive portrayal of Alzheimer’s Disease and yet also giving a huge shot in the arm to a hopeful resurgence in the British Noir art form.

The Fear (Episode Three), Channel Four. Television Review.

Picture from Channel 4.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Peter Mullan, Anastasia Hille, Harry Lloyd, Paul Nicholls, Richard E. Grant, Demosthenes Chrysan, Dragos Bucar, Shaban Arifi, Julia Ragnarsson, Danny Sapani, Nigel Lindsay, Osy Ikhile, Sidney Kean, Lisa McAllister, Catherine Winter, Amarildo Kola.

The tension that had been building in the framework of The Fear reaches almost fever pitch proportions as the escalating war between the Kosovan’s and Richie’s family starts to mirror the war going on inside his head.

The Fear (Episode Two), Channel Four. Television Review.

Picture from Channel 4.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Peter Mullan, Anastasia Hille, Harry Lloyd, Paul Nicholls, Richard E. Grant, Demosthenes Chrysan, Dragos Bucar, Shaban Arifi, Julia Ragnarsson, Danny Sapani, Nigel Lindsay, Osy Ikhile, Sidney Kean, Lisa McAllister, Catherine Winter, Amarildo Kola.

Episode two of The Fear sees the further mental disintegration of crime lord Richie Beckett and the disturbing brutality that passes between the two warring families taken up to an even higher gear.

The Fear, Channel 4, Television Review.

Peter Mullan In The Fear. Picture from Channel 4.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Peter Mullan, Anastasia Hille, Harry Lloyd, Paul Nicholls, Demosthenes Chrysan, Dragos Bucar, Shaban Arifi, Julia Ragnarsson, Danny Sapani, Nigel Lindsay, Osy Ikhile, Sidney Kean, Lisa McAllister, Catherine Winter, Amarildo Kola.

Gone it seems, are the days of Pinkie Brown and the black and white days of the south coast’s criminal underbelly in Brighton Rock. Now the terrifying prospect of Eastern European gang culture rears in head in the seedy dangerous world of The Fear and it’s a far more dangerous world than teen hoodlum Pinkie could have ever have imagined.

Great Expectations (2011), Television Review.

Originally published by L.S. Media. January 5th 2012.

L.S. Media Rating ****

Cast: Gillian Anderson, David Suchet, Douglas Booth, Ray Winstone, Shaun Dooley, Claire Rushbrook, Mark Addy, Jack Roth, Vanessa Kirby, Harry Lloyd, Tom Burke, Oscar Kennedy. Izzy Meikle-Small.

One of the big shows for the B.B.C. this Christmas period has to have been the latest big budget version of Great Expectations. An all-star cast, one of the biggest for a television series for a while on the channel, was greatly added to by newcomers Oscar Kennedy as the young Pip, Izzy Meikle-Small as the young misguided and manipulated Estella and a towering performance by Douglas Booth as the elder Pip.

The Hollow Crown, Henry IV Part One. B.B.C. Television Review.

Originally published by L.S. Media. July 11th 2012

L.S. Media Rating ****

Cast: Tom Hiddleston, Jeremy Irons, Julie Walters, Maxine Peake, Tom Georgeson, Simon Russell Beale, Alun Armstrong, Joe Armstrong, Harry Lloyd, Michelle Dockery, Robert Pugh.

If the first in the B.B.C.’s Hollow Crown adaptations of William Shakespeare’s history plays Richard II focused on the nature of chivalry in the time of noble kings, then the second, Henry IV, Part One focused on the story of what was too come. With an elderly Henry on the throne of England and with the playboy Prince of Wales taking up with thieves, robbers and undesirables in the taverns of Cheapside, it was more of an eye on how the boy, one of the best loved characters in Shakespeare and royal history, became the man he was to become.