Tag Archives: Craig Roberts

Bad Neighbours, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T. Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating *

Cast: Seth Rogen, Rose Byrne, Zac Efron, Dave Franco, Brian Huskey, Ike Barinholtz, Carla Gallo, Halston Sage, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Lisa Kudrow, Jerrod Carmichael, Craig Roberts, Ali Cobrin, Hannibal Buress.

 

It seriously makes you worry for the future of American comedy if all a studio can come up with is a film that relies far too much displaying the bodily differences between the two main male leads, more needless swearing than you find underlined in a dictionary by somebody with limited vocabulary and an over reliance on showcasing the university fraternity system and their spat with modern day suburbia. It has been down before, with better artistry, finer scripts and with a couple of notable exceptions with better leads and supporting cast. Bad Neighbours is no Animal House. It even has the dubious pleasure of somehow managing to make the National Lampoon films seem like gold dust.

Under Milk Wood, 2014 Cast Recording. Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Michael Sheen, Tom Jones, Matthew Rhys, Aimee-Ffion Edwards, Tom Rhys Harries, Karl Johnson, Iwan Rheon, Aneurin Barnard, Ioan Gruffudd, Kimberley Nixon, Steffan Rhodri, Mark Lewis Jones, Richard Harrington, Sophie Evans, Melanie Walters, Griff Rhys Jones, John Rhys Davies, Andrew Howard, Rakie Ayola, Jonathan Pryce, Sian Phillips, Bryn Terfel, Katherine Jenkins, Charlotte Church, Tom Ellis, Aneirin Hughes, Robert Pugh, Suzanne Packer, Eve Myles, Alexandra Roach, Craig Roberts, Sharon Morgan, Owen Teale, Di Botcher, Sian Thomas, Jon Tregenna.

The Double, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Jesse Eisenberg, Mia Wasikowska, Wallace Shawn, Noah Taylor, Rade Serbedzija, Yasmin Paige, James Fox, Phyllis Somerville, J. Mascis, Sally Hawkins, Cathy Moriarty, Chris O’Dowd, Paddy Considine, Chris Morris, Georgie-May Tearle, Craig Roberts.

What happens when your worst enemy is you? Not psychologically, at least not in the beginning but you, your face is their face, your life is slowly becoming their life and no matter what you do, your existence is being erased, you become even more of a non-entity, a being of such unimportance that people forget your name when they shake your hand, would you fight back to restore your individuality and own self-worth? This is the problem facing the superb Jesse Eisenberg in Richard Ayoade’s dark, almost 1984 like black comedy The Double.