Tag Archives: Bill Milner

Dunkirk. Film Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Cast: Mark Rylance, Tom Hardy, Kenneth Brannagh, Aneurin Barnard, Cillian Murphy, Fionn Whitehead, Harry Styles, Damien Bonnard, Lee Armstrong, James Bloor, Barry Keoghan, Jack Lowden, Luke Thompson, Michael Biel, Constantin Balsan, Billy Howle, Mikey Collins, Callum Blake, Dean Ridge, Bobby Lockwood, Will Attenborough, Tom Nolan, James D’Arcy, Matthew Marsh, Adam Long, Miranda Nolan, Bradley Hall, Jack Cutmore-Scott, Brett Lorenzi, Michael Fox, Brian Vernal, Elliott Tittensor, Harry Richardson, Jochum ten Haaf, Johnny Gibson, Kim Hartman, Calum Lynch, Charley Palmer Rothwell, Tom Gill, John Nolan, Bill Milner, Jack Riddiford, Harry Collett, Eric Richard.

Anthropoid, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Cast: Jamie Dornan, Cillian Murphy, Toby Jones, Brian Caspe, Karel Hermánek Jr., Sara Arsteinova, Sean Mahon, Jan Hájek, Marcin Dorocinski, Alena Mihulová, Bill Milner, Charlotte Le Bon, Pavel Reznícek, Anna Geislerová, Justin Svoboda, Harry Lloyd, Václav Neuzil, Jiri Simek, Detlof Bothe, Jan Budar, Mish Boyko, David Bredin, Roman Zach, Sam Keeley, Alexander van der Groeben, Andrej Polak.

Locke, Film Review. Picturehouse@Fact, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Tom Hardy, Nqabilezitha Mhlonga, Olivia Coleman, Ruth Wilson, Andrew Scott, Ben Daniels, Tom Holland, Bill Milner, Danny Webb, Alice Lowe, Silas Carson, Lee Ross, Kirsty Dillon.

American cinema may have invented the concept of the “Road Movie”, just as they did with the beat poetry that used the idea as metaphor to describe life but surely in the hands of one film, British cinema has shown exactly what can be done with the genre. The wide open spaces that run the width of the United States is can be argued is a poor substitute to the tediousness that is inflicted upon drivers in the U.K., the road in America takes you to the place you want to be, the road in Britain takes you where you need to be. For that prospect alone makes Locke one of the finest films dealing with solitude and everyday realism that you are likely to come across.

The 7:39, Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 7/10

Cast: David Morrissey, Sheridan Smith, Olivia Coleman, Sean McGuire, Izzy Meikle-Small, Bill Milner, Justin Salinger, Lashana Lynch, Mohammed Ali, Ancuta Breaban, Raj Ghatak, John Hiorns.

We have all looked at the person on the other side of train aisle at one time or another and caught a furtive glance coming our way, thoughts of introducing yourself brushed aside by responsibility and those waiting at home.

The Secret Of Crickley Hall (Part Three), B.B.C. Television. Television Review.

Suranne Jones in The Secret of Crickley Hall. Picture from the B.B.C.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Suranne Jones, Tom Ellis, Douglas Henshall, David Warner, Sarah Smart, Iain DeCaestecker, Olivia Cooke, Maise Williams, Bill Milner, Kian Parsiani, Pixie Davies, Donald Sumpter.

The Secret Of Crickley Hall, Part Two. Television Review. B.B.C. Television.

The Secret of Crickley Hall. Picture from the B.B.C.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Suranne Jones, Tom Ellis, Douglas Henshall, David Warner, Sarah Smart, Iain DeCaestecker, Olivia Cooke, Maise Williams, Bill Milner, Kian Parsiani, Pixie Davies, Donald Sumpter.

The second part of Joe Ahearne’s adaptation of James Herbert’s The Secret of Crickley Hall sees the tension stoked up as the malevolent force of Douglas Henshall’s Augustus Cribben starts to take more of a hold on the lives of the young family that resides in the former orphanage.

The Secret Of Crickley Hall, B.B.C. Television. Television Review.

Tom Ellis and Suranne Jones in The Secret Of Crickley Hall. Picture from the B.B.C.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Suranne Jones, Tom Ellis, Douglas Henshall, David Warner, Sarah Smart, Iain De Caestecker, Olivia Cooke, Maise Williams, Bill Milner, Kian Parsiani, Pixie Davies.

It seems odd that the premier 20th century British horror writer, James Herbert, has never had many adaptations of his copious amount and in most cases prestigious work. What has been filmed has been woeful at best and an affront to British Horror at its seedy worst. For the B.B.C. to pick up the option to one of the great writer’s latter works, the sadistic and suspenseful The Secret of Crickley Hall is a coup for both writer and television viewer.