Category Archives: Live

At Last The Etta James Story, Gig/ Theatre Review. Epstein Theatre, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Etta James’s larger than life story is such that it could be the proud moment in a television schedule or a Box office hit at the cinema; one of the finest, most complete voice of Blues to have ever graced the stage, she ranks alongside the likes of Billie Holliday, Big Mama Thornton and Janis Joplin as the all-embracing women of the genre, somebody who truly lived the life, who gave their life to sing the Blues.

Toyah, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

There is so much to like, to love about Toyah Wilcox that she really does get inside the soul of those who have been touched by her aura of rebellion, her sense of searching for a truth and her physical spirit. For many she embodies an age where the first signs of female dominance in her craft come forth, not with the handshake of patriarchal consent but with determination and drive of the post war feminine guile, wit and strength that carried the country past its outdated Victorian lies and into one of colour, of Punk, of resplendent anarchy and into a thankfully socially more entertaining age.

China Crisis, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

The 80s were to be seen a boom time for British pop, if there was one great sweeping movement that could see away the frenzied but short lived beauty of Punk it was surely the sometimes sensitive, the occasionally brash, the always fruitful and never ashamed decade of the 1980s and the music that truly dominated it and cursed in many ways the decade the followed.

Elfin Bow, Gig Review. Epstein Theatre, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Elfin Bow cuts a figure of radiant cool as she stands upon the stage at the Epstein Theatre, bathed not only in the glow of spotlights that change with the mood of the song, not only caught in the appreciation of an audience who have travelled the distance with her, but one who with a sense of serenity captures the mood of an album launch to its very finest interpretation, a show, a feast for the crowd, ones who are sated and comfortable, enriched by the experience of what has come before them, an offering by an artist.

Seafoam Green, Gig Review. Music Rooms, Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

March always brings its own personal bluster and rage along with it, it is a month that dominates in many ways its environments and whilst January and February can be particularly cruel and deceitful, March verges on madness, on a tight spring, a vicious beast coiled up ready to pounce and knock you over with unexpected results. To combat the madness thrown up by a month which doesn’t believe in just standing still, in which rain and shine are intermingled like a bad marriage, some restoration of beauty and calm are needed.

The Scott Poley Project, Gig Review. Studio 2, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Liverpool and the vast majority of the United States of America don’t have that much in common, take out New York City and its melting pot of institutions and flavoursome watering holes with the nights of poetry, music and lively debate aside, there really is not a lot to tie the city beside the Mersey say with Texas, Georgia or the Mid West States where cowboys still roam and the talk is of oil, current incumbents of the White House and rattlesnakes.

Ben Hughes, Gig Review. Studio 2, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

The age old question of how to warm up an audience to the point where the inner thermostat is making the mercury rise to the occasion, but not peaking too soon so that it blows out any possible enjoyment as the night progresses, is one that always makes for great debate on a night out. You want someone with class, with poise, great demeanour and content but someone who also knows exactly where to take the audience too, the cup of perfect tea surrounded by those would overfill the saucer is always more enjoyable.

Brit Floyd, Gig Review. Echo Arena, Liverpool. (2017).

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

It could be argued that the pulse of the Universe runs through the veins of what we feel, the mood we inhabit and the longing we have deep inside of us for the comfortable and unnerving in equal measure; such is that pulse, such is beauty in a single note that the art and the artist are entwined, that even hearing it performed by another is enough to raise the goosebumps to a point where they can be seen from space.

Anaisa, Gig Review. District House, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

There are venues strewn throughout this land that somehow on the surface don’t seem from the outset, from the first eyes upon it, to be the type of place in which anything other than a grand piano in the corner and lady with an impressive gown and gentle manners performing on it for the tea and smoked salmon brigade could be construed out of place.

Penny Mob, Gig Review. District House, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

North London’s rich cultural landscape has never felt as though it has anything to hide, it stands in the shadow of two of football’s great football teams, it has the gentility running through its veins and like its neighbour to the south-east, the area around Whitechapel and the East End, it has the blood of expression oozing from every pore, sweat of young aspiration clambering to be noticed. Like Liverpool, it delivers with delicate but hard fought battle, music that has the muscle to wedge itself between you and a place of comfort; a comfort that has no right to be anywhere in sight but far too often gets involved in the day to day listening of the nation.