The Dead Cassettes, Gig Review. Johnsons’ Pavilion, Bootle.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Life is too short to waste worrying too much about the past, it should be seen as a guide, a tutor, the teacher who educates to the point where the lessons are learned, committed to memory, and then the individual should be able to move on with the next moment where they step out blinking in the sun and putting their next triumph on show for people to take notice. We all have regrets, we all play that same image in our heads over and over again, it is natural to think back to the time when the path became a choice; it is taken and we deal, it just might be that the soundtrack is better, even on the Dead Cassettes.

Tipping Cows.

Being in part a country boy,

raised with Cornish ideals

and my teenage years in a small

rural market town

deep in the Oxfordshire

countryside, summers in glorious

abandon on Guernsey country lanes,

I see no problem with tipping cows,

after all most work hard

in the sweaty conditions

of any restaurant and they get treated

like serfs by the chefs;

I see no problem with giving them

fifteen percent

on top of the bill, especially

if they give a courteous moo.

 

Choc Electrique, Gig Review. Johnsons’ Pavilion, Bootle.

Choc Electrique in Bootle, July 2016. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

Choc Electrique in Bootle, July 2016. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

In the shadow of the now abandoned St. Andrews Church, a building that once tried to save souls and dish out compassion, where a modern for sale sign bristles against the thought of commercialism and the ravage of capitalism, a front man of delight of dedication reached out to the assembled and took them on a small journey of groove, a service of musical enlightenment and to one which the pulpit of the stage was not big enough, one in which the superb Choc Electrique powered over the crowd and Greedy Jesus, the front man for the 21st Century led the congregation into musical heaven.

Hegarty, Gig Review. Johnsons’ Pavilion, Bootle.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

The storming finish, the band that gets people up to dance and forget the finite detail of the week they may have had, the month they have had to scrape through, that band is worth its weight in gold. It may be the one that you turn to when all seems desperate, the loose ended feeling, your all time favourite from decades past, yet a band that can calm the nerves, stop the pressure from boiling over and take you out of your head as a Saturday folds itself away into the past forever, that is the band in which to really be seen with. There are a few of them in Liverpool, in the freshly young bracket that are 21st Century delivered, they all stand out, as too does the final group in the Battle of the Bands, the festival of musical things on the bowling green lawn in Bootle – Hegarty.

The Huyton Minstrel, Gig Review. Johnsons’ Pavilion, Bootle.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

It is not just Bootle that can be seen as being forgotten in many ways by the higher powers that be, the area of Huyton, as well as other places in the North West and those beyond the remit of the Westminster village, has also suffered and its people, those who work in the on-going rejuvenation of Liverpool, must at times wonder when is it their turn and who really speaks for them, what weaver of words is their lauded king or queen to make the area stand up for itself.

Interrobang, Gig Review. Johnsons’ Pavilion, Bootle.

Interrobang performing in Bootle, July 2016. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

Interrobang performing in Bootle, July 2016. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

The air is punctured, the big bang of the angry, cross and disillusioned comes out across the scene of serenity with truth galloping beside it at such a rate of knots that it is possible to feel the strength of rightful bitterness as if it were a tornado, a hurricane on the verge of demolishing the insidious and the crass, the self serving and the out and out distasteful. This was the cold wind of reality that captured the mood but didn’t spoil it, that enhanced the reasons to which the town of Bootle has felt the pressure of for decades.

Keith Lally, Gig Review. Johnsons’ Pavilion, Bootle.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

To find Keith Lally in the area is to feel the calm reassurance that one might expect if you came across a local map of the surroundings and with a signpost to safety, past the storms, through the complexities of harm and the routes of dead end obliteration, it is the finding in which you know the music will guide you, in which the point of the day becomes meaningful and the endeavour of spiritual exhaustion is relieved and completely and neatly folded away.

Pod Cousins, Gig Review. Johnsons’ Pavilion, Bootle.

Pod Cousins performing in Bootle, July 2016. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

Pod Cousins performing in Bootle, July 2016. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

There is always something new to learn, someone else’s voice that must be heard, appreciated and perhaps loved, life without learning is to become stilted, stuck forever in the machine that is designed to grind you down to a place of acceptance and interminable arrogance.

Ste Neildsy, Gig Review. Johnsons’ Pavilion, Bootle.

Ste Neildsy performing in Bootle. July 2016.

Ste Neildsy performing in Bootle. July 2016. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Acoustic is what acoustic does; in the scheme of things, it might get lost in the clamour of the fast paced and often absurd world we find ourselves inhabiting. It might be passed by and only thought of as something you might find at a wedding or in the confines of a smaller sized venue, one in which is often passed by for the big brash experience, the pounding of the beat.

Dying Hide.

I am not clever enough

to understand your words

at times. The majority

I comprehend, I empathise with

and nod in appreciation, if not

in agreement of your dilemma,

the narrow view in which you have painted

yourself in, the corner of the room

in which paint has not met floor

or ceiling covered over with wallpaper,

is like your mind,

a career in trying to look good

but not achieving a half way decent result;

stuck between self interest

and poorly managed heartbeats,