Tag Archives: Sam Riley

Free Fire, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Enzo Cilenti, Sam Riley, Michael Smiley, Brie Larson, Cillian Murphy, Armie Hammer, Sharlto Copley, Babou Ceesay, Noah Taylor, Jack Reynor, Mark Monero, Patrick Bergin, Sara Dee, Tom Davis.

A film in which so much happens in the space of 90 minutes can either leave you so breathless that it will make you forget most of what has transpired on screen or reeling from the shock of it all that it stays with you forever; imprinted into your mind like a seared brand and smouldering long into the memory. These are the films that you want to see again because you know deep down that in between each involuntary blink, you missed so much, so much reference to the greatness that has unfolded; these are the films to absolutely love and defend to the death.

SS:GB. Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Sam Riley, James Cosmo, Fritz Kellermann, Kate Bosworth, Lars Eidinger, Maeve Dermody, Jason Flemyng, Jonathan Cass, Sam Kronis, Christina Cole, Lucas Gregorowicz, Louis Ashbourne Serkis, Andrew Bicknell, James Northcote, Michael Epp, Aneurin Barnard, Julian Rhind-Tutt, Danny Webb.

 

In the last century one of the defining moments for Britain is the Second World War, we seem to make the most of a single act of defiance that because of what could be perceived as arrogance by others, we cheerfully, and most times out of disrespect to the those we are trying to insult, love to tell the line about how Britain won the war.

Suite Française, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

Cast: Michelle Williams, Kristin Scott Thomas, Matthais Schoenaerts, Sam Riley, Ruth Wilson, Margot Robbie, Harriet Walter, Eileen Atkins, Lambert Wilson, Tom Schilling, Clare Holman, Deborah Findlay, Eric Godon, Simon Dutton, Diana Kent, Juliet Howland, Nicholas Chagrin.

 

As the 21st Century grumbles on and the further we move away from the period of time in which our grandparents gave up on almost everything except hope, the more the apathy to maintaining the struggle against oppression grows more weary. In some cases it is possible to hear some people state out loud, “Shouldn’t we forget all this now?” Yet stories from the Second World War continue to surface and perhaps none more startling in recent years than that of Irène Némirovsky and her posthumously published unfinished novel Suite Française.