Tag Archives: Rachel Weisz

My Cousin Rachel. Film Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Sam Claflin, Rachel Weisz, Holliday Grainger, Iain Glen, Poppy Lee Friar, Andrew Knott, Andrew Havill, Vicky Pepperdine, Katherine Pearce, Harry Hays, Tristram Davies, Chris Gallarus, Bobby Scott, Freeman.

The very name Daphne Du Maurier is one surely that should conjure up the very essence of British writing and one that stands alongside the greatest of the 20th Century, Agatha Christie and Virginia Woolf, and yet for one of Cornwall’s greatest adopted daughters, her passionate, often moody but always multi-layered work, doesn’t get the screen treatment it deserves, and aside from the fantastic adaption of The Birds and Rebecca by the legendary director Alfred Hitchcock, the writer has been pretty much left of the list of books that are ripe for bringing to an even greater audience.

Denial, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Rachel Weisz, Tom Wilkinson, Timothy Spall, Andrew Scott, Jack Lowden, Caren Pistorius, Alex Jennings, Harriet Walter, Mark Gatiss, John Sessions, Nikki Amuka-Bird, Pip Carter, Jackie Clune, Will Attenborough, Maximilian Befort.

In a time when such things are being questioned, that the extreme right have hijacked once more the very ground of what should be decency and respect and turned into a quagmire of ignorance and sick attitude, Denial is perhaps one of the most sensitive and timely films to come to cinema in recent years.

The Lobster, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

Cast: Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz, Olivia Coleman, Léa Seydoux, Ben Whishaw John C. Reilly, Ashley Jensen, Jessica Barden, Angeliki Papoulia, Ariane Labed, Roland Ferrandi, Ewen MacIntosh, Roland Ferrandi, Garry Mountaine, EmmaEdel O’Shea, Garry Mountaine.

There are films that engross you, that pull you in from the very start, the intrigue of the dynamic opening, that no matter how the film progresses from that point, no matter the connection made between film-goer and intended meaning by the writer and director, you are already living and breathing in the black celluloid dystopia on offer, such is the surreal quality of life and of The Lobster.