Tag Archives: Paddy Considine

Death Of Stalin. Film Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Jason Isaacs, Andrea Riseborough, Olga Kurlenko, Steve Buscemi, Rupert Friend, Jeffrey Tambor, Paddy Considine, Richard Brake, Michael Palin, Simon Russell Beale, Paul Whitehouse, Roger Ashton-Griffiths, Jonathan Aris, Adrian McLoughlin, Gerard Lepkowski, Dermot Crowley, Cara Horgan.

Politics is a game of wills, the necessity of horse trading played out on a global scale and one in which the sides change so quickly that any gains made one individual are soon scattered to the dusty footnotes of history. It is a game that when played well deserves its own satire, the weak and ineffective politicians get forgotten, the ones who scramble to the top have no other choice but to face the fact that even in death they will be satirised and parodied by the best of writers.

The Girl With All The Gifts, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 7.5/10

Cast: Gemma Arterton, Sennia Nanua, Glenn Close, Paddy Considine, Dominique Tipper, Anamaria Marcinca, Anthony Walsh, Lobna Futers, Fisayo Akinade.

The Girl With All The Gifts, the latest in a long line of Zombie apocalypse films that scream for attention and makes use of the fear that has invaded our thoughts in the last century; yet this contribution to the horror genre is not one that has the usual suspects running the show, this is the calm and fire all in one body, one who can save us but also tear us apart. It is a film that allows the cinema goer room to breathe but one that asks it not to, to take a large deep breath and keep in until the guts are about to burst.

Macbeth, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * *

Cast: Michael Fassbender, Elizabeth Debicki, Marion Cotillard, Sean Harris, David Thewlis, Jack Reynor, Paddy Considine, David Hayman, Lynn Kennedy, Maurice Roëves, Seylan Baxter, James Harkness, Roy Sampson.

There are moments when going to the cinema should be a true joy to behold. The merging of both the cinematic experience and theatre portrayed as a guiding light of how to bring out the very best from arguably England’s greatest playwright.

Child 44, Film Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * *

Cast: Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, Mark Lewis Jones, Joel Kinnaman, Fares Fares, Karel Dobrey, Agnieszka Grochowska, Petr Vanek, ana Stryková, Jason Clarke, Ursina Lardi, Michael Nardone, Jemma O’Brien, Lottie Steer, Barbora Lukesová, Petr Semerád, Paddy Considine, Zdenek Barinka, Finbar Lynch, Ned Dennehy, Vincent Cassel, Hana Frejková, Gary Oldman, Tara Fitzgerald, Charles Dance, Xavier Atkins.

 

Pride, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Bill Nighy, Imelda Staunton, Andrew Scott, Dominic West, George Mackay, Paddy Considine, Joseph Gilgun, Faye Marsey, Freddie Fox, Ben Schnetzer, Jessie Cave, Liz White, Sophie Evans, Monica Dolan, Jessica Gunning, Chis Overton. Russell Tovey.

America can provide you with the blockbuster, Europe the art, India the beauty but when it comes to truth, justice, the gritty political outpouring, nobody does it better than the British film industry. Blockbusters are all well and good, the stimulation the senses, they blow the mind. Art and beauty is needed to wrap up the human emotion and give it meaning, realism is what brings it together, what makes the cinema goer believe in and restores a balance in a world that is too eager to make sure that division is seen everywhere.

The Double, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Jesse Eisenberg, Mia Wasikowska, Wallace Shawn, Noah Taylor, Rade Serbedzija, Yasmin Paige, James Fox, Phyllis Somerville, J. Mascis, Sally Hawkins, Cathy Moriarty, Chris O’Dowd, Paddy Considine, Chris Morris, Georgie-May Tearle, Craig Roberts.

What happens when your worst enemy is you? Not psychologically, at least not in the beginning but you, your face is their face, your life is slowly becoming their life and no matter what you do, your existence is being erased, you become even more of a non-entity, a being of such unimportance that people forget your name when they shake your hand, would you fight back to restore your individuality and own self-worth? This is the problem facing the superb Jesse Eisenberg in Richard Ayoade’s dark, almost 1984 like black comedy The Double.

The World’s End, Film Review. FACT Cinema, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Paddy Considine, Martin Freeman, Eddie Marsan, Rosamund Pike, Pierce Brosnan, Bill Nighy, David Bradley, Mark Heap, Steve Oram, Jasper Levine, Reece Shearsmith.

 

Is there nothing that Simon Pegg, Nick Frost and Edgar Wright cannot put together that isn’t just pure British comedy gold? For the first fifteen minutes of the latest film to come from the warped and surreal imagination of Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright, The World’s End, it felt as if though the run had finally come to a crashing and disturbing end. Not so much comedy, not so much a film bought together by some of the most talented people around but the sinking feeling that this was more about a pool of writers and actors finally admitting defeat and waving a white flag but making a tedious journey round of jokes concerning the drinking culture of the U.K.