Tag Archives: Noah Taylor

Paddington 2. Film Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Cast: Ben Whishaw, Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins, Michael Gambon, Imelda Staunton, Hugh Grant, Jim Broadbent, Julie Walters, Noah Taylor, Peter Capaldi, Brendon Gleeson, Joanna Lumley, Eileen Atkins, Ben Miller, Tom Conti, Meera Syal, Samuel Joslin, Madeline Harris, Sanjeev Bhaskar, Simon Farnaby, Jessica Hynes, Richard Ayoade, Tom Davies, Cal McCrystal.

It is through the eyes of the innocent that we perhaps see beauty and good in the world, that we don’t just tolerate the storms and the fire that surround us but that we embrace it, we seek out the violence not to get a thrill from the fight but to hopefully offer a solution, a kind word spoken can make the difference in a day and in a person’s life.

Free Fire, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Enzo Cilenti, Sam Riley, Michael Smiley, Brie Larson, Cillian Murphy, Armie Hammer, Sharlto Copley, Babou Ceesay, Noah Taylor, Jack Reynor, Mark Monero, Patrick Bergin, Sara Dee, Tom Davis.

A film in which so much happens in the space of 90 minutes can either leave you so breathless that it will make you forget most of what has transpired on screen or reeling from the shock of it all that it stays with you forever; imprinted into your mind like a seared brand and smouldering long into the memory. These are the films that you want to see again because you know deep down that in between each involuntary blink, you missed so much, so much reference to the greatness that has unfolded; these are the films to absolutely love and defend to the death.

And Then There Were None, Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Catherine Bailey, Douglas Booth, Charles Dance, Maeve Dermody, Burn Gorman, Christopher Hatherall, Anne Maxwell Martin, Sam Neil, Miranda Richardson, Toby Stephens, Noah Taylor, Ben Deery, Jim Main, Daisy Waterstone.

The British obsession with murder owes more to the conditioning belief of understanding that order will always be restored rather than wanting to see someone get away with the act. Not for nothing is the book charts on any local high street bookshop always seen to have the latest crime novel within tidy ranks but the authors of such are seen arguably to be in the eyes of many people amongst the most interesting to read. Nobody wants to see anyone get away with murder but there is always something slightly devilish about hoping to see it attempted and in Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None murder is drawn to a perfect art.

The Double, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Jesse Eisenberg, Mia Wasikowska, Wallace Shawn, Noah Taylor, Rade Serbedzija, Yasmin Paige, James Fox, Phyllis Somerville, J. Mascis, Sally Hawkins, Cathy Moriarty, Chris O’Dowd, Paddy Considine, Chris Morris, Georgie-May Tearle, Craig Roberts.

What happens when your worst enemy is you? Not psychologically, at least not in the beginning but you, your face is their face, your life is slowly becoming their life and no matter what you do, your existence is being erased, you become even more of a non-entity, a being of such unimportance that people forget your name when they shake your hand, would you fight back to restore your individuality and own self-worth? This is the problem facing the superb Jesse Eisenberg in Richard Ayoade’s dark, almost 1984 like black comedy The Double.