Tag Archives: Michael Palin

Death Of Stalin. Film Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Jason Isaacs, Andrea Riseborough, Olga Kurlenko, Steve Buscemi, Rupert Friend, Jeffrey Tambor, Paddy Considine, Richard Brake, Michael Palin, Simon Russell Beale, Paul Whitehouse, Roger Ashton-Griffiths, Jonathan Aris, Adrian McLoughlin, Gerard Lepkowski, Dermot Crowley, Cara Horgan.

Politics is a game of wills, the necessity of horse trading played out on a global scale and one in which the sides change so quickly that any gains made one individual are soon scattered to the dusty footnotes of history. It is a game that when played well deserves its own satire, the weak and ineffective politicians get forgotten, the ones who scramble to the top have no other choice but to face the fact that even in death they will be satirised and parodied by the best of writers.

John Finnemore’s The Wroxton Box. Radio Comedy Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

Cast: John Finnemore, Michael Palin.

The trouble is with the 20th Century, there are just too many candidates for the title of most destructive human to walk the Earth. Some merit their position purely by being in a position of power, by sending their armies into invade and cause annihilation of a particular people, of lives wiped out and their history’s erased purely out of suspicion and greed. For some though the misery they cause comes down to public arson, of dismantling the nation’s heritage all in the name of so called progress; Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher undoubtedly belongs in the column, and so too does the murderer of the Railways, Dr. Richard Beeching.

Monty Python’ Spamalot, Theatre Review. Empire Theatre, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Jamie Tyler, Sarah Earnshaw, Joe Tracini, Will Hawsworth, Richard Kent, Richard Meek, Josh Wilmott, Michael Palin, Daniel Crane, Abigail Climer, Matthew Dale, Holly Eaterbrook, Richard Astbury, Ste Clough, Inez Mackenzie.

It’s no wonder that the chroniclers of Middle and Old English History have very little to go on, save the odd Anglo Saxon lord and a few scattered bones of cows that have been forcibly flown through the air and the legends of dire and almost indestructible rabbits who would tear a man’s head off given half a chance. Nothing of note seems to have happened until King Arthur and his loyal, if utterly bewildered, Knights of the Round Table went in search of the Holy Grail and under strict instructions by Michael Palin, as played by God.

Remember Me, Television Review. B.B.C.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * *

Cast: Michael Palin, Mark Addy, Hodie Comer, Julia Sawalha, Jamie-Rooney-West, Tony Pitts, Eileen Davies, Mayuri Boonham, Kate Dobson, Mina Anwar, Noreen Kershaw, Kirsty Hoiles, Ubayd Rehman, Aqib Khan, Sheila Hancock, Rebekah Staton, Rita May, Marcus Garvey, Richard Lumsden, Orla Cottingham, Gary Pillai, Roger Grainger, Tony Monroe, Indra J. Adler, Hilly Barber, Garry Marriott.

Remember Me is the first outing in dramatic role for what seems an interminable age for one of Yorkshire’s favourite sons Michael Palin. It is a role that perhaps offered so much to one of the absolute greats of British comedy but ultimately fell flat with little hope of being considered one of the giant’s great visual feasts.

Walls.

The legendary giant of heavy rock has his back turned away from me

as he stands guard and watches over all the other photographic memories

in the room.

There is no false great works of art upon the walls of the house,

aside from those I have chosen to place against the half decorated structure.

When I was younger I had posters that scattered the three walled sides in my Bicester

bedroom and I was told that eventually I would grow

to having just the one perfectly wooden framed piece of art to stare at and draw

Monty Python Live (Mostly), Theatre And Cinema Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Michael Palin, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones.

There will be many who will never get what it was all about but for the multitude, Monty Python followed a natural path that had been laid down by The Frost Report, That Was The Week That Was and The Goons, the ability to send up Britain, the revolution of the way we looked at ourselves as a nation in the post war era and in how we finally were able to put two crafty fingers up to a hierarchy in which didn’t care.