Tag Archives: Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall

Toyah, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

There is so much to like, to love about Toyah Wilcox that she really does get inside the soul of those who have been touched by her aura of rebellion, her sense of searching for a truth and her physical spirit. For many she embodies an age where the first signs of female dominance in her craft come forth, not with the handshake of patriarchal consent but with determination and drive of the post war feminine guile, wit and strength that carried the country past its outdated Victorian lies and into one of colour, of Punk, of resplendent anarchy and into a thankfully socially more entertaining age.

China Crisis, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

The 80s were to be seen a boom time for British pop, if there was one great sweeping movement that could see away the frenzied but short lived beauty of Punk it was surely the sometimes sensitive, the occasionally brash, the always fruitful and never ashamed decade of the 1980s and the music that truly dominated it and cursed in many ways the decade the followed.

The Classic Rock Show, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool. (2017).

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

It is the genre for which most arguably feel the stirrings of blood heading towards the heart as if it was on fire, the hose full of water and the draining of the reservoir not enough to quench the undying inferno which rages with passion and excitement. Classic Rock is a genre that might have its detractors but for those the drum kick hunts and the guitar follows like a wolf in the night, insatiable hunger wanting to be sated, it is more than just a type of music, it is the point of existence.

Paul Carrack, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool. (2017).

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

Liverpool will always welcome back those who make the point, who express the truth of their love for the city; it can only ever hoped that such sentiment is always given and not neglected like other cities that turn their back on you. It is a sentiment that it is articulated with musical brilliance by Paul Carrack, a genuine man, a special musician, and one who understands just how much the city relishes in seeing its heroes on the stage.

Dr. Hook Starring Dennis Locorriere, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

It is in the flourish of the performance, the smile upon an artist’s face when they can be seen, witnessed by all, to be having just a good a time as their audience, the equality of art is assured and in the end it doesn’t matter a jot who the performer is, what matters is that the love between crowd and musician is real, complete and without end.

Gary Puckett, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

When an international star makes their debut appearance in the city it is the duty of all who profess to love music to get to the venue and bathe in the splendour of the moment; especially when that star has been credited as one of Elvis’ favourites and who has thrilled millions for decades.

P.J. Proby, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Such is the hypocrisy embedded in the national psyche that it allowed the dichotomy of the 60s to be one where the flowering of the nation started to really take great strides forward in terms of art and enjoyment but it allowed the self appointed harbingers of supposed moral supremacy to flourish unchecked and take down those they found to be objectionable; it is always a pleasure therefore surely to watch a singer who upset the blue rinse guardian Mary Whitehouse.

Brian Poole And The Tremeloes, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

In a world that is slowly being preserved in amber, from a period when a hit single truly meant something and was as precious as a polished gem, to have three members of the same band not only on stage and singing with the serenity of a bird that is free to look down from edge of space and see nothing but the Universe’s wide mouth expectation above it, but also doing it with ease, friendliness and smiles, it is enough to give hope to an audience that has seen so many of its traditions fall aside and be swept away by the modern age.

Wayne Fontana, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

There are moments that you are sure that music will live forever, it might change, it could evolve, the cycle of what is sexy and what is indescribable nonsense will change, it will revolve and switch across the generations and the genres but one thing is undeniable, that great music that defined the beat of a generation, that a voice that can make a person swoon and another’s heart race faster even after 50 years is apt to be a bit special.

Level 42, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Level 42's Mark King at the Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool. October 2016. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

Level 42’s Mark King at the Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool. October 2016. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

There was always something about them that was so right, the sound that was different to the pop dominance of British music in the 1980s and 90s. It was enough to make sure that their style of performing, the hard swish of the distinctive bass and funk undertones, was guaranteed a special status in the hearts of music fans; Level 42 were always going to be a positive influence upon the ears.