Tag Archives: Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall

Level 42, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool. (2018).

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

It would be easy to give the phrase “There is something about them“ a gentle autumn-clean and present it as if it was the most novel expression coined about Level 42, however despite the wording being over used, it remains a factor of the subtly, the complexity and delivery of the band’s music that makes it a truth always worth pursuing and being entrusted with spreading the word about.

The Blow Monkeys, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

All good memories fade eventually, perhaps not disappearing forever, never completely out of grasp, but they do fade, they might lose their lustre, the moment when you declared a love forever lost to age, responsibility and the unknowing regret of not designed neglect, that is life, a passion for the always in your sight, replaced by the allure of other more tangible and currently immediate passions.

Steeleye Span, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

History is a place where the modern-day eye falls sharply, and arguably with some personal antagonism, into the realm of judgement and criticism. It is a place that people forget the modern age in which we breathe our daily dust in, will also one day be criticised, pored over with unsentimental eyes and the feeling of damned ill-favour. To stand in the way of that judgement, to carry on producing great songs of lyrical poetry, of music that is powerful in its intent, and demanding in its delivery, that is verging on the heroic, it is to remain resolute in the face of those who dare suggest with snide lips, that nothing of the days that have passed is relevant anymore.

Jacqui McShee, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

When there are no more worlds in which to conquer, the explorer lays down their map and their compass, and slowly, but surely, disappears into the background, eventually merging with the times and places they have discovered. For many of us that holds true, the vast majority of those around you stop discovering many years before their time, they take out the compass one final time, put the backpack of half ideas formed, and then take root and watch the camp fire flicker with memories that slowly turn to dust and the tear of what was once passed.

Caro Emerald, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Caro Emerald at the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall, October 2018. Photograph by Ian D. Hall.

The Queen of European Jazz waves her hand in time to the motion of the scintillating sound that clutches at the air of inspiration and unrequited love, it is a flourish that gives the audience the memory of Time, of understanding that the genre in which Caro Emerald has become the iconic figure and sound, requires at all times, to flow, to be constantly in flux, that the beat that has carried her towards the figure of 100 live performances in the U.K. alone, is a constant wild animal that needs handling with almost regal, and maternal care.

Loren Nine, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

A Dutch invasion and surrounded by the scent of intrigue and the possible hint of tulips that hangs in the air, a purveyance, a regal like flourish to the autumn serenade in which Caro Emerald, the undisputed Queen of European Jazz, returns to Liverpool, and alongside her in the carriage of musical expression, something, a passion for expression, a dominating thought of what we might miss as a society if we continue to turn our collective backs on Europe, the artistry of the young, of the timeless, and of the Netherland’s own Loren Nine.

O.M.D. And The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

To keep any art form locked inside its comfortable shell is to consign its soul to eventual oblivion. The masters of the painted value, its subject matter slowly fading under the pressure of light and Time, has to be eventually restored less it becomes invisible and a memory to others who would out on the flavour of the day, the poet seeks a fresher audience, a new way of delivery, the modern theatre audience wishes for nothing more than the view of the modern day in the classic; so too should music be constantly allowed to evolve, to hear a song of the listener’s youth be usurped in resolute re-evaluation keeps the songs fresh and beautiful.

The Analogues, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Imagine being at Candlestick Park, the home of the San Francisco Giants, in late August 1966, or around two and half years later, on January 30th 1969, at ground level in Central London, looking up to the heavens and hearing the now unfamiliar live sound of four men from Liverpool. Imagine understanding that both these two events were so significant in the annals of music history, not only for the band, but for the wider implication of what went on between the two dates and what would follow; it would almost certainly be the stuff of legends, a screaming mob of fans who paid between four and six Dollars to attend the final throws of infant pop, and the almost quiet drawing on a London street of the curtain on the first part of legendary status confirmed for ever.

Graham Nash, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

There are few typically warm, lovingly affectionate, and genuinely positive welcomes to the Philharmonic Hall stage as there is joyfully reserved for what could be said to be the elder statesmen and women of the music world. The ones to whom kick started off the whole love affair with British pop music, to the ones who found fame not once, but over the course of different bands and outings, who made the crowd sing along to the best known, and sometimes more obscure, songs, the heroes of the 60s have always held a special place in the hearts of music lovers.

Travis, Gig Review. Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

The mid to late 90s British music scene will perhaps always be dominated by the thought of a collection of bands to whom the world, in one way or another, idolised, venerated and almost single-handedly took all the glory, all the passion and much of the energy that would have been arguably better suited to groups, artists and song writers to whom deserved it so much more. The Man Who would, the woman who could, have served the attentions of the public better because there was nothing more than splendour in their music, no egos, no bitterness, just a serenade that was inclusive and deeply, melancholic, melody driven, assuredly beautiful.