Tag Archives: Daniel Kaluuya

Get Out, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

Cast: Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Catherine Keener, Bradley Whitford, Caleb Landry Jones, Marcus Henderson, Betty Gabriel, Lakeith Stanfield, Stephen Root, Lil Rel Howery, Ashley LeConte Campbell, John Wilmot, Julie Ann Doan, Rutherford Cravens, Geraldine Singer, Jeronimo Spinx, Ian Casselberry, Trey Burvant, Richard Herd, Erika Alexander, Yasuhiko Oyama.

A man enters a world that is as strange as it is uncomfortable, one where alienation is dressed up in smiles, style and a welcoming handshake, this is the experience of many around the world, the stranger in a strange land, not one to fit in, but one whose very existence is deemed to be a boost to the community in a very different way than may have been expected.

Sicario, Film Review. Picturehouse@F.A.C.T., Liverpool.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 7/10

Cast: Emily Blunt, Benicio Del Toro, Josh Brolin, Victor Garber, Daniel Kaluuya, Julio Cedillo, Jon Bernthal, Bernardo P. Saracino, Kim Larrichio, Eb Lottimer.

Who is the pawn in the biggest game when it comes to trafficking on the borders of the United States of America and Mexico? Arguably the richest country on Earth per capita and one of the poorest sitting side by side, the inequality between the two countries perhaps never really equalled out going back to the war between the two countries in which had land not been lost and ceded to the United States, all that money that flowed from the discovery of oil would have seen the economies of the two countries wildly different as the 21st Century progressed.

Babylon, Television Review. Channel 4.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 7/10

Cast: Brit Marling, James Nesbitt, James Robinson, Paterson Joseph, Adam Deacon, Jill Halfpenny, Mark Womack, Nicola Walker, Daniel Kaluuya, Nick Blood, Andrew Brooke, Deborah Rosan, Lee Nicholas Harris, Bertie Carvel, Lee Asquith-Coe, Navin Chowdhry, Ella Smith, Jaspal Badwell, Vic Waghorn, Paul Blackwell, Stuart Matthews, Stuart Martin, Jonny Sweet, Elena Hargreaves.

Despite Babylon opening with the type of shot that Channel Four were famous for when they first started out as a broadcaster, the kind of camera angle that would make the late Mary Whitehouse splutter and cough as if somebody had suggested she should drown her sorrows in a five day bender in Majorca, the pastiche of modern policing by Danny Boyle, Jesse Armstrong and Sam Bain was at least a look through a polarised lens at the way the public see today’s Police Force.