Category Archives: TV

Doctor Who: Smile. Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

Cast: Peter Capaldi, Pearl Mackie, Matt Lucas, Kiran L. Dadlani, Mina Anwar, Ralf Little, Kalungi Ssebandeke, Kira Shah, Craig Gardener.

 

Smile and the world smiles with you, cry and your likely to have little time left in your life to worry about such matters as emotion, at least that is how it is presented by the excellent Merseyside writer Frank Cottrell-Boyce in the superb second story of the new series of Doctor Who.

Broadchurch, Series Three. Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: David Tennant, Olivia Colman, Jodie Whittaker, Andrew Buchan, Carolyn Pickles, Arthur Darvill, Julie Hesmondhaigh, Lenny Henry, Sarah Parish, Charlie Higson, Charlotte Beaumont, Adam Wilson, Matthew Gravelle, Joe Sims, Jim Howick, Hannah Rae, Peter De Jersey, Mark Bazeley, Georgina Campbell, Sebastian Armesto, Georgina Campbell, Hannah Millward, Chris Mason, Roy Hudd, Richard Hope, Josetta Simon, Kelly Gough, Sahana Harrison, Becky Brunning, Deon Lee-Williams.

Maigret’s Night At The Crossroads, Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Rowan Atkinson, Lucy Cohu, Shaun Dingwall, Mark Heap, Aiden McArdle, Kevin McNally, Dorothy Atkinson, Ben Caplan, Paul Chahidi, Mia Jexen, Katherine Kanter, Jonathan Newth, Wanda Opalinska, Chook Sibtain, Leo Starr, Robin Weaver, Tom Wlaschiha, Stephen Wright, Max Wrottesley.

We all reach that decision sooner or later, we find ourselves perhaps tempted by the thought of a better life, of a world in which our care free abandon can run free riot and be held by the person that our dreams desire or we can keep going, being safe, being right and knowing full well the path we have chosen is not governed by avarice and jealousy, not by the path of the bullet.

Doctor Who, The Pilot. Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 8.5/10

Cast: Peter Capaldi, Pearl Mackie, Matt Lucas, Nicholas Briggs, Jennifer Hennessy, Stephanie Hyam.

What are the greatest of gifts you can give anybody, it isn’t anything you can wrap, you can’t spend it, you cannot offer it as a prize, for then the truly worthy don’t receive it and the undeserving don’t value it. Time, compassion, patience and the ability to listen without expecting to have to answer back, these are the greatest gifts and as a species we have become very bad at offering these moments to people without expecting some kind of reward.

Prime Suspect 1973, Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Stefanie Martini, Sam Reid, Blake Harrison, Alun Armstrong, Andrew Brooke, Daniel Ezra, Jessica Gunning, Joshua Hill, Jordan Long, Tommy McDonnell, Ruth Sheen, Lex Shrapnel, Jay Taylor, Rosie Day, Clive De-Halton Gibson, Nicholas Sidi, Anthony Skordi, Geraldine Somerville, Nneka Okoye, Aaron Pierre, Nancy Caroll, Jacob James Beswick, Thomas Coombes, Dorian Lough.

SS:GB. Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Sam Riley, James Cosmo, Fritz Kellermann, Kate Bosworth, Lars Eidinger, Maeve Dermody, Jason Flemyng, Jonathan Cass, Sam Kronis, Christina Cole, Lucas Gregorowicz, Louis Ashbourne Serkis, Andrew Bicknell, James Northcote, Michael Epp, Aneurin Barnard, Julian Rhind-Tutt, Danny Webb.

 

In the last century one of the defining moments for Britain is the Second World War, we seem to make the most of a single act of defiance that because of what could be perceived as arrogance by others, we cheerfully, and most times out of disrespect to the those we are trying to insult, love to tell the line about how Britain won the war.

Taboo, Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * * *

Cast: Tom Hardy, David Hayman, Jonathan Pryce, Oona Chaplin, Jessie Buckley, Stephen Graham, Richard Dixon, Leo Bill, Edward Hogg, Ruby May-Martinwood, Franka Potente, James Greaves, Michael Kelly, Jefferson Hall, Louis Ashbourne Serkis, Jason Watkins, Scroobius Pip, Nicholas Woodeson, Tom Hollander, Mark Gatiss, Christopher Fairbank, Lucian Msamati, Fiona Skinner, Marina Hands, Edward Fox.

The Moorside, Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 9/10

Cast: Sheridan Smith, Siobhan Finneran, Gemma Whelan, Sian Brooke, John Dagleish, Dean Andrews, Steve Oram, Gail Kemp, William Hunt, Cody Ryan, Sally Carr, Faye McKeever, Tom Hanson, Erin Shanagher, Darren Connolly, Cathy Breeze, David Zezulka, Charlotte Mills, David Peel, Kirsty Armstrong, Macy Shackleton, Martin Savage, Steve Garti, Rebecca Manley, Paul Opacic.

It was a crime that horrified Britain, a moment in the nation’s psyche that leaves a scar, not because of loss of life but one in which loss of self respect and hope became the headline news.

Apple Tree Yard, Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating 7/10

Cast: Emily Watson, Ben Chaplin, Mark Bonnar, Susan Lynch, Olivia Vinall, Stephen Elder, Jack Hamilton, Syreeta Kumar, Assad Zaman, Kezia Burrows, Steffan Rhodri, Adeel Akhtar, Rhashan Stone, Lydia Leonard, Nick Sampson, Frances Tomelty, Laure Stockley, Sebastian Armesto, Denise Gough, Adrian Lukis.

The problem with putting on a drama on the television, no matter how well intentioned, is that in some respects the pace of the script feels disjointed, it can either be too fast and therefore lose the viewer’s attention by being overly complicated or too slow and then being the type of programme in which the person enduring the ongoing situation is forced to believe that many of the scenes or characters could have been cut or not bothered with at all.

Endeavour: Harvest. Television Review.

Liverpool Sound and Vision Rating * * * *

Cast: Shaun Evans, Roger Allam, Anton Lesser, Sean Rigby, Dakota Blue Richards, James Bradshaw, Sheila Hancock, Sara Vickers, Alex Mann, Simon Meacock, Caroline O’Neill, Natalie Burt, Michael Pennington, Joanna Horton, Jane Whittenshaw, Chris Coghill, Emily Forbes, Grahame Fox.

It can never be too much of a coincidence that in times of deep disharmony, of scaremongering and deep fear biting at the ankles of those immersed in watching world events, that a television drama, even of the murder/crime genre, can take you back to the roots of the nuclear power debate and show just how close such thinking can wreck the environment and kill thousands of people if there was an accident or act of sabotage.